Most early teens have been exposed to porn and they’re being ‘desensitised’ via violent material

Getty
Young Girl Using Smartphone

The research revealed 53% of 11 to 16-year-olds have seen porn online

Experts are worried that youngsters are becoming desensitised to violent and degrading images and footage. Most children have been in contact with online porn by their early teens, a study has found.

The research revealed 53% of 11 to 16-year-olds have seen porn online.

By the age of 14, the figure is 94%. It is 28% for 11- to 12-year-olds.

Peter Wanless, chief executive of the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, said: “A generation… are in danger of being stripped of their childhoods at a young age by stumbling across extreme and violent porn online.

Getty
Girl using laptop
By the age of 14, the figure is 94% – it is 28% for 11- to 12-year-olds

“Frighteningly, some children are growing up believing they should emulate behaviour they see in porn, which can have a damaging effect on their relationships.”

He added the Government and porn industry must “take more responsibility to ensure young people are protected”.

Read more:
Exposure to extreme and violent porn at a young age is ‘extremely damaging’ to children, NSPCC warns

The study found that 39% of 13 to 14-year-old boys want to copy behaviour they have witnessed in porn.

11 to 16-year-olds exposed to online porn

Erotic picture on mobile phone

53%

A lad of 13 told researchers: “One of my friends has started treating women like he sees on the videos.

“Not major, just a slap here or there.”

A 13-year-old girl said: “A few of my friends have used it for guidance about sex and are getting the wrong image of
relationships.”

Experts have highlighted the danger of kids being desensitised to extreme material.

Children who have viewed inappropriate material by 14

Teenage boy lying down on bed with laptop computer

94%

Boys 13-14 who want to copy behaviour seen in porn

39%

The study foreword said: “It cannot be right so many children may be stumbling across and learning about sex from degrading and violent depictions of it.”

Of those surveyed 33% said they first saw pornography on a smartphone or handheld device.

Read more:
Children investigated for ‘blackmailing each other with explicit images on Snapchat and Facebook’

A worrying 14% admitted they had taken naked or semi-naked photos of themselves.

Getty
Boy typing on computer
14% admitted they had taken naked or semi-naked photos of themselves

Half shared the image with others.

Researchers from Middlesex University talked to more than 1,000 youngsters aged 11 to 16 on behalf of the NSPCC and the Children’s Commissioner for England, Anne Longfield.

She said: “This is the first generation to have been raised with technology that’s taken the internet from the front room, where parents can monitor use, to their bedrooms or the playground, where they can’t.

“We know from the research that very many children are shocked, confused or disgusted by what they see.”

Russell Hobby, general secretary of school leaders’ union NAHT, said schools can play a key role in “preventing harmful sexual behaviour” by teaching children about their rights and responsibilities.

Should we be teaching nursery-age children about sex as a way of preventing abuse?

DailyMirror