movie review: this is a film that everyone in India needs to see

Ayushmann Khurrana stars from the movie based on shocking true events: its Narrative and message Surely hits a nerve
Anubhav Sinha’s Article 15 is a hard-hitting movie that tackles the caste discrimination that’s rampant in India — and, as this story reveals, fatally so at times.
The nation is predominantly Hindu, the religion from which the caste system stems. It prides itself in its message that”unity is diversity” and has been the largest democracy in the world for at least seven decades. The values and rules of the country all stem from the Constitution of India, a publication and lawful guide supplied by BR Ambedkar (who was from the Dalit caste, but eventually converted from Hinduism to Buddhism and campaigned against caste discrimination).
The movie draws its name from Article 15 of this publication: that prohibits discrimination against any citizen on grounds of race, religion, caste, sex or place of arrival.
But the truth is that caste discrimination is a malaise that is widespread, especially in the Hindi heartland. This reality is pushed home multiple times by the film, with its cast filled with stellar performances. In reality, almost every dialogue and functionality deserves applause. There are exactly four lines of comic relief, but those are so applicable and they discharge the tension which builds with the rest of the scenes, which are dead serious.

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Lead actor Ayushmann Khurrana, following on from the success of Andhadhun and Badhaai Ho, plays senior police officer Ayaan Ranjan, who has been partially educated overseas and has to come to grips with the fact of caste discrimination – something he’s read mostly about in the media – when one gruesome and unfair murder case lands on his desk.
In real life, Khurrana belongs to the highest grade of Brahmins, and so it the top of the caste order.
Ayushmann Khurrana in ‘Article 15’. Photo: You Tube/Zee Music Company
THE DETAILS
Article 15
Produced by: Carnival Cinemas, Zee Studios
Directed by: Anubhav Sinha
Our evaluation: 4/5
Anubhav Sinha’s Article 15 is a hard-hitting movie that simplifies the caste discrimination that’s rampant in India — and, as this story shows, fatally so at times.
The country is mainly Hindu, the faith from which the caste system stalks. It prides itself in its message that”unity is diversity” and has been the biggest democracy in the world for at least seven decades. The values and rules of the nation all stem from the Constitution of India, a book and legal guide supplied by BR Ambedkar (who was from the Dalit caste, but eventually converted from Hinduism to Buddhism and campaigned against caste discrimination).
Virtually Every dialogue and performance deserves applause
The movie draws its name from Article 15 of this book: that forbids discrimination against any citizen on grounds of race, religion, caste, sex or place of birth.
But the truth is that caste discrimination is a malaise that is widespread, especially in the Hindi heartland. This reality is driven home multiple occasions by the movie, with its cast filled with stellar performances. In fact, almost every dialogue and performance deserves applause. There are just four lines of comic relief, but these are so pertinent and they release the tension which builds with the remaining scenes, which are dead serious.
Lead celebrity Ayushmann Khurrana, following on from the success of Andhadhun and Badhaai Ho, plays senior police officer Ayaan Ranjan, who has been partially educated abroad and has to come to grips with the reality of caste discrimination – something he has read mostly about in the media – when one gruesome and unfair murder case lands on his desk.
In real life, Khurrana belongs to the maximum grade of Brahmins, and therefore it the cover of the caste order.
Directing and making this highly sensitive social play is Anubhav Sinha, who directed the favorite Mulk, which handled Islamaphobia.
The film tells a story based in fact, and builds on the 2014 Badaun rape situation, in which two teenage women were murdered in Uttar Pradesh. The girls were from the Dalit caste, viewed as the lowest on the brink. The authorities say the women, who had been hanged in public, were not raped, however the families to this day insist that they had been.